End-User Programming and Blended-User Programming

1999 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems

CHI 99
15-20 May 1999
Pittsburgh, PA, USA
http://www.acm.org/sigchi/chi99

CHI 99 Workshops provide an extended forum for small groups to exchange ideas on a topic of common interest. Workshop participation is by invitation only based on position papers submitted by 26 February 1999. The 14 Workshops for CHI 99 will be held 16-17 May 1999.

One workshop that may be of particular interest to PPIG readers is:

End-User Programming and Blended-User Programming

End-User Programming has not met expectations: today's computer world is dominated by "fatware" programs with hundreds of features, not simple applications built by the users themselves. Yet, a strange convergence is occurring between roles of programmers and end-users. Professional programmers become end users of complex IDEs (Integrated Development Environments) indistinguishable from tools for non-programmers. A new group we call "blended-user programmers" has appeared -- professional application experts without software degrees: Web designers and GUI or business applications programmers. Major end-user applications support a continuum of programming tools; advanced users may move into these new software careers.

This workshop will use and re-evaluate insights of classical end-user programming to understand the converging programming world. Questions it may address:

  • What are useful boundaries of "programming" in an environment of check-box customization and code modification?
  • What are appropriate programming abilities for schoolchildren and adults to learn? What requirements are minimized with modern tools?
  • What are commonalties and differences between new areas of blended/end-user programming and forms studied earlier?
  • What technical and social interactions develop when "real" programmers with CS degrees work with blended-user programmers from much less formal backgrounds?
  • Do certificate courses primarily expand blended-user programmers repertoire of tinkering, or make them more analytical?

Fifteen experts in end-user programming, psychology and sociology of programming backgrounds will be selected based on position papers. If appropriate, these may be published as a book to inform research and practice in this emergent area.

Workshop participation is by invitation only based on position papers submitted by 26 February 1999

Contact:
Carol Traynor
St. Anselms College
100 St. Anselm Drive
Manchester NH 03102 USA
Tel: +1 603 656 6021
Email: ctraynor@cs.uml.edu 

The workshop website is at: http://www.cs.uml.edu/~hgoodell/EndUser/blend/index.html.

For further information about CHI 99 Workshops, contact the CHI 99 Workshop Co-Chairs at: chi99-workshops@acm.org

The annual CHI conference is sponsored by ACM's Special Interest Group on Computer-Human Interaction (ACM SIGCHI).